Beef recipes

Beef recipes

About Ray-Monde Deux Salers Beef
1

Cuts in our beef packs represent the percentage of cuts over the animal. Most people will not realise 30-40% of meat ends up as mince, approximately 10-15% will be our favourite steak cuts (prime cuts) of porterhouse, ribeye, eye fillet, rump and the remaining 45-60% are secondary cuts that require a little more thought and TLC but offer fantastic flavour.
Flavour in meat comes from the diet of the animal, fat, its age and how the meat is processed such as dry aging. Free range pasture fed animals get to eat a veritable salad bar of grasses, the flavour in the meat is quite literally "you are what you eat". Pasture fed animals have a range of omega acids/fats in their flesh which has a healthier spectrum as compared to grain fed animals.
Cattle lay down fat from the head to the tail, secondary cuts like chuck (neck) and brisket (chest/meat over the ribs) have fat layered in the meat, whereas cuts such as rump and silverside (back end of the animal) are generally leaner although they can have a generous fat cap which is the fat which sits just under the hide and covers the meat.
The age of the animal also affects flavour, the older the animal such as an Prime Steer (3yrs and older) will have more flavour as compared to a weaner or yearling which will be more tender.
Dry aging is a process of hanging meat for several weeks before it is butchered into its cuts for packaging and consumption. The moisture evaporates from the meat, concentrating the flavour. Enzymes in the meat breakdown the connective tissue resulting in more tender beef.
Our beef is 3yr old Prime Steer, free range pasture fed, the meat has been dry aged for 1-5weeks before being packaged
You will soon find although the steak is very good there are many flavoursome cuts other than the prime cuts!
These are recipes on our website we used on our beef. We love the results and wish to share with Ray-Monde Deux beef consumers!

What is a primary and secondary cut
2

Beef cuts known as "primary" or "prime cuts" are the most tender cuts on a beef carcass, the meat becomes more tender as distance from hoof and horn increases. These are the cuts/muscle groups that do the least work in the mid-section of the animal. The cuts include porterhouse, ribeye, scotch, sirloin, fillet steak/tenderloin, t-bone and rump.

"Secondary cuts" are those that contain the most connective tissue. Connective tissue makes the cut tougher, the most connective tissues is in the cuts of the shoulder and leg because of the work these muscles do. Cooked right, secondary cuts offer a lot of flavour and reward! The cuts include Chuck (Neck), Shin (Shank, Osso Bucco or Gravy beef), Brisket (ribs, short ribs), Flank, Knuckle, Cheek, Ox tail, Silverside, and Topside.

Quick cooking recipes
3

This section refers to the prime cuts, steaks! It is quicker cooking than secondary cuts but that is not to say steaks do not require preparation.
If you have frozen your meat, thaw it in refrigerator rather than using the microwave. Microwaves can turn the most tender cuts into rubber! Whether you are pan frying, barbecuing, oven cooking or using a skillet always get your mode of cooking up to temperature before cooking. Use good olive oil and lightly season the meat with salt, pepper or even Spanish paprika. The maximum I cook any of the cuts is to medium. Once done, allow your dish to rest/cool, the meat keeps on cooking after the heat has been removed.

I also include in the quick or quicker cooking section, mince.
Mince is totally under estimated, good quality mince gives and soaks up flavour! It should never exude water which often happens with supermarket purchased mince which shrinks to tiny grains of meat......Good mince should have a robust flavour contributing ample flavour to tomato sauce resulting in "a to die for" bolognese sauce.

So many dishes can be made with great mince - pizza's, beef burgers, meat balls, meatloaf just to name a few!

Slow Cooking
4

Wet slow cooking is what most slow cooking cooks know, using good stock and wine, or water in the case of corned meat is fantastic for cuts of meat with little fat or that have more connective tissue. The beef cuts I am referring to are topside, silverside, corned silverside, corned brisket, knuckle/round steak, oyster blade, osso bucco and skirt, these cuts can be used as whole pieces or steaks. Ensure to completely emersion the cuts in the stock/wine when wet cooking, it gives an even tender result.
I love to do topside steaks in stock and red wine. When cooked, I carefully lift out the steaks with an egg lifter (they will fall apart) and keep warm covered in the oven, reduce the cooking juices and make into a reduction to pour over the steak, serve with creamy mash and greens. Or reserve the juices for the next wet slow cook piece and have the steak as a steak sandwich with your regulars of caramelised onion, home-made relish or a good mustard, a good soft cheese, rocket and cherry tomatoes. The slow cook cut becomes summer fair.

Dry slow cooking is essentially the equivalent to oven slow cooking, with dry slow cooking in a slow cooker it is a little more forgiving than oven slow cooking. The moisture of the meat is trapped in the slow cooker although it is possible to overcook the meat. Dry slow cooking is great for cuts which a higher component of fat, that is, they contain more moisture in the cut.
I like to keep my rubs and marinade simple, when using our Saler beef or Ryeland lamb, I want the flavour the meat to shine.
Beef, whole roasting pieces of chuck, blade, rolled brisket, spare ribs, shin (gravy beef cut into the muscle group as a whole piece) again just rub with a little olive oil, salt and pepper. This type of cooking lends itself to presenting a whole piece of meat to the table, winter or summer, serve with vegetables or salad. The meat can be “pulled” or cut put over a crispy salad again summer time fair, you can see my slow cooker never gets a rest!

Ingredients

Directions

About Ray-Monde Deux Salers Beef
1

Cuts in our beef packs represent the percentage of cuts over the animal. Most people will not realise 30-40% of meat ends up as mince, approximately 10-15% will be our favourite steak cuts (prime cuts) of porterhouse, ribeye, eye fillet, rump and the remaining 45-60% are secondary cuts that require a little more thought and TLC but offer fantastic flavour.
Flavour in meat comes from the diet of the animal, fat, its age and how the meat is processed such as dry aging. Free range pasture fed animals get to eat a veritable salad bar of grasses, the flavour in the meat is quite literally "you are what you eat". Pasture fed animals have a range of omega acids/fats in their flesh which has a healthier spectrum as compared to grain fed animals.
Cattle lay down fat from the head to the tail, secondary cuts like chuck (neck) and brisket (chest/meat over the ribs) have fat layered in the meat, whereas cuts such as rump and silverside (back end of the animal) are generally leaner although they can have a generous fat cap which is the fat which sits just under the hide and covers the meat.
The age of the animal also affects flavour, the older the animal such as an Prime Steer (3yrs and older) will have more flavour as compared to a weaner or yearling which will be more tender.
Dry aging is a process of hanging meat for several weeks before it is butchered into its cuts for packaging and consumption. The moisture evaporates from the meat, concentrating the flavour. Enzymes in the meat breakdown the connective tissue resulting in more tender beef.
Our beef is 3yr old Prime Steer, free range pasture fed, the meat has been dry aged for 1-5weeks before being packaged
You will soon find although the steak is very good there are many flavoursome cuts other than the prime cuts!
These are recipes on our website we used on our beef. We love the results and wish to share with Ray-Monde Deux beef consumers!

What is a primary and secondary cut
2

Beef cuts known as "primary" or "prime cuts" are the most tender cuts on a beef carcass, the meat becomes more tender as distance from hoof and horn increases. These are the cuts/muscle groups that do the least work in the mid-section of the animal. The cuts include porterhouse, ribeye, scotch, sirloin, fillet steak/tenderloin, t-bone and rump.

"Secondary cuts" are those that contain the most connective tissue. Connective tissue makes the cut tougher, the most connective tissues is in the cuts of the shoulder and leg because of the work these muscles do. Cooked right, secondary cuts offer a lot of flavour and reward! The cuts include Chuck (Neck), Shin (Shank, Osso Bucco or Gravy beef), Brisket (ribs, short ribs), Flank, Knuckle, Cheek, Ox tail, Silverside, and Topside.

Quick cooking recipes
3

This section refers to the prime cuts, steaks! It is quicker cooking than secondary cuts but that is not to say steaks do not require preparation.
If you have frozen your meat, thaw it in refrigerator rather than using the microwave. Microwaves can turn the most tender cuts into rubber! Whether you are pan frying, barbecuing, oven cooking or using a skillet always get your mode of cooking up to temperature before cooking. Use good olive oil and lightly season the meat with salt, pepper or even Spanish paprika. The maximum I cook any of the cuts is to medium. Once done, allow your dish to rest/cool, the meat keeps on cooking after the heat has been removed.

I also include in the quick or quicker cooking section, mince.
Mince is totally under estimated, good quality mince gives and soaks up flavour! It should never exude water which often happens with supermarket purchased mince which shrinks to tiny grains of meat......Good mince should have a robust flavour contributing ample flavour to tomato sauce resulting in "a to die for" bolognese sauce.

So many dishes can be made with great mince - pizza's, beef burgers, meat balls, meatloaf just to name a few!

Slow Cooking
4

Wet slow cooking is what most slow cooking cooks know, using good stock and wine, or water in the case of corned meat is fantastic for cuts of meat with little fat or that have more connective tissue. The beef cuts I am referring to are topside, silverside, corned silverside, corned brisket, knuckle/round steak, oyster blade, osso bucco and skirt, these cuts can be used as whole pieces or steaks. Ensure to completely emersion the cuts in the stock/wine when wet cooking, it gives an even tender result.
I love to do topside steaks in stock and red wine. When cooked, I carefully lift out the steaks with an egg lifter (they will fall apart) and keep warm covered in the oven, reduce the cooking juices and make into a reduction to pour over the steak, serve with creamy mash and greens. Or reserve the juices for the next wet slow cook piece and have the steak as a steak sandwich with your regulars of caramelised onion, home-made relish or a good mustard, a good soft cheese, rocket and cherry tomatoes. The slow cook cut becomes summer fair.

Dry slow cooking is essentially the equivalent to oven slow cooking, with dry slow cooking in a slow cooker it is a little more forgiving than oven slow cooking. The moisture of the meat is trapped in the slow cooker although it is possible to overcook the meat. Dry slow cooking is great for cuts which a higher component of fat, that is, they contain more moisture in the cut.
I like to keep my rubs and marinade simple, when using our Saler beef or Ryeland lamb, I want the flavour the meat to shine.
Beef, whole roasting pieces of chuck, blade, rolled brisket, spare ribs, shin (gravy beef cut into the muscle group as a whole piece) again just rub with a little olive oil, salt and pepper. This type of cooking lends itself to presenting a whole piece of meat to the table, winter or summer, serve with vegetables or salad. The meat can be “pulled” or cut put over a crispy salad again summer time fair, you can see my slow cooker never gets a rest!

Beef recipes